Ecotoxicology

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Shiva Shams

PhD student (extern)

Tel.: +39-0461615531

shiva.shams(at)iasma.it

Publications

Conference talks

  1. S. Shams, L. Cerasino, N. Salmaso and D.Dietrich . Experimental models of microcystin accumulation in Daphnia magna grazing on Planktothrixrubescens: potential for microcystin transfer through the food web.SEFS 8 (8th Symposium for European Freshwater Science), Münster, Germany. 1-5 July 2013.
  2. N. Salmaso, S. Shams, L. Cerasino.Development of cyanobacteria and production of cyanotoxins in Lake Garda: statistical models and predictive power. Workshop of Quality and sustainable use of water resources in Lake Garda and in other large water bodies in Europe: experiences within the project EULAKES, Gardone Riviera, Brescia, Italy. May 30th, 2013.

  3. L. Cerasino, S. Shams, N. Salmaso.Cyanotoxins in Lake Garda?The critical evaluation of chemodiversity.Workshop of Quality and sustainable use of water resources in Lake Garda and in other large water bodies in Europe: experiences within the project EULAKES, Gardone Riviera, Brescia, Italy. May 30th, 2013.

  4. L. Cerasino, S. Shams, N. Salmaso and D.Dietrich. The impact of toxic cyanobacteria on the water quality in the Deep Subalpine Lakes (DSL).European Geosciences UnionGeneral Assembly, Vienna, Austria. April 7 – 12, 2013.

  5. S. Shams, L. Cerasino, N. Salmaso and D.Dietrich.Diversity And Seasonality Of cyanotoxins In Lake Garda (Italy): Potential For Hepatotoxic Microcystins Transfer Through The Food Web. 15th International Conference on Harmful Algae, Changwon, Republic of Korea. Oct 29 - Nov 2, 2012.

  6. L. Cerasino, S. Shams, N. Salmaso and D. Dietrich. Toxic potential of cyanobacteria in oligo-mesotrophic lakes: the case of Lake Garda (Italy). 3rd European Large Lakes Symposium University of Konstanz. Oct 8 - 12, 2012.

  7. S. Shams, L. Cerasino, and N. Salmaso . Diversity and seasonality of cyanotoxins in Lake Garda. 4th EULAKE meeting and science day, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences,Vienna, Austria. Nov 28 -30, 2011.

  8. S. Shams, M. Milan, J. Ranjan, M. Tolotti, L. Cerasino, A. Boscaini and N. Salmaso. Ecological changes of Central European Lakes within the EU Project EULAKES: nuisance cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins, and their impact on aquatic ecosystems and water quality at different temporal scales. 16th Workshop of the International Association of Phytoplankton Taxonomy and Ecology (IAP), San Michele all'Adige, Italy. Aug 21-28, 2011.

  9. S. Shams, L. Cerasino, J. Ranjan, , and N. Salmaso. Cyanotoxins and their impact on water quality in Central Europe lakes. The 7th symposium of the European Freshwater Science, Girona, Spain. June 26– July 1, 2011.

  10. J. Ranjan, S. Shams, L. Cerasino, and N. Salmaso. Ecological changes of central European lakes within the EU project EULAKES: nuisance cyanobacteria and impact on the aquatic ecosystems. The 7th symposium of the European Freshwater Science, Girona, Spain. June 26– July 1, 2011.

Poster Abstracts

  1. S. Shams, L. Cerasino, J. Ranjan, , and N. Salmaso. Cyanotoxins and their impact on water quality in Central Europe lakes. The 7th symposium of the European Freshwater Science held in Girona, Spain (26.06.-01.07.2011).
  2. S. Shams, M. Milan, J. Ranjan, M. Tolotti, L. Cerasino, A. Boscaini and N. Salmaso. Ecological changes of Central European Lakes within the EU Project EULAKES: nuisance cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins, and their impact on aquatic ecosystems and water quality at different temporal scales. 16th Workshop of the International Association of Phytoplankton Taxonomy and Ecology (IAP), San Michele all'Adige, TR, Italy (21-28.08.2011).

Curriculum vitae

  • 2011-Present: PhD student in the Human and Environmental Toxicology group at the University of Konstanz, Germany; and in the IASMA Research and Innovation Centre - Fondazione Edmund Mach, San Michele all’Adige (TN), Italy.
  • 2009-2011: M.Sc. in Marine Ecotoxicology at Botany Department, Stockholm University, Sweden.
  • 2000-2004: B.Sc. in Marine Biology at Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran.

Research

PhD project:

Diversity, impact and fate of cyanobacterial toxins in freshwater ecosystems.

Cyanobacteria are considered as the key component in aquatic ecosystems. However, some cyanobacteria genera are capable of producing a wide range of secondary metabolites, so called cyanotoxins including hepatotoxins (microcystins, nodularins), neurotoxins (saxitoxins, anatoxins, BMAA), cytotoxins, dermatotoxins and irritant toxins (lipopolysaccharides). Globally, the most frequently found cyanotoxins in fresh and brackish water are the cyclic peptides microcystins. Cyanobacterial toxins can pose serious threats to human health either directly through contaminated water, inhaling toxin-containing aerosols during  recreational activities (swimming, water skiing or boating) or  indirectly through transfer of toxins along food web while consuming contaminated foods (fishes, molluscs,…).

Cyanotoxins have the potential to affect organisms at a variety of trophic levels. Very little is known about the mechanisms of this phenomenon and in general about the impact of cyanotoxins on aquatic biota, including the extent to which these toxins transfer between trophic levels.

It is therefore a matter of concern to understand the fate of cyanotoxins in aquatic food webs and to know the extent to which cyanotoxins are accumulated or degraded through trophic level.

Lake Garda has been chosen as model system in a research project whose main aim is to elucidate the fate of the cyanotoxins in freshwater trophic webs. Lake Garda is the largest lake in Italy and one of the most popular holiday resorts in Europe. It is a LTER (Long Term Ecological Research network) site and has a resident population of potentially toxic cyanobacteria. The most frequent potential toxic cyanobacterial species in Lake Garda are Planktothrix rubescens and Anabaena lemmermannii. The former species produces essentially microcystins, while the latter species produces anatoxins and microcystins. In the past years bloom episodes in Lake Garda have been ascribed to Anabaena lemmermannii.

The cyanotoxins diversity the distribution though the food web of Lake Garda is being investigated because of the importance of the trophic chain phytoplankton (cyanobacteria) – zooplankton - nekton (fishes) for the productivity and health of ecosystem, apart from being of interest to human health and recreation.

M.Sc. project:

Occurrence of cyanobacterial neurotoxin BMAA in blue mussels and oysters and cyanobacterial diversity (a study from Swedish west coast, Skagerrak Sea, and the Baltic Sea), under the supervision of prof. Ulla Rasmussen.